Tuesday, 04 August 2020

What will 6G look like? Samsung has an answer

by Harry Baldock, Total Telecom
Wednesday 15 July 20

In its latest white paper, Samsung said that 6G technology could see its early commercialisation as early as 2028

In recent days especially, 5G technology is becoming increasingly mired in geopolitical conflict. In a sense, it seems ironic that the day the UK banned Huawei from its 5G networks, prompting some to claim that 5G deployment and development would be slowed by two years, Samsung was releasing a white paper on 6G technology – even speculating on an accelerated date of 2028 for initial commercialisation…

In recent days especially, 5G technology is becoming increasingly mired in geopolitical conflict. In a sense, it seems ironic that the day the UK banned Huawei from its 5G networks, prompting some to claim that 5G deployment and development would be slowed by two years, Samsung was releasing a white paper on 6G technology – even speculating on an accelerated date of 2028 for initial commercialisation.
 
With 5G still in its relative infancy, what exactly 6G looks like is a very difficult question to answer. However, in a new white paper, Samsung is detailing what it describes as “the company’s vision” for 6G, including new technologies, requirements and spectrum usage expectations.
 
Naturally, the white paper includes details on some of the most exciting innovations expected to be enabled by 6G including fully immersive extended reality, high fidelity mobile holograms, and accurate digital replicas of our physical selves. 
 
To achieve 6G, Samsung says that requirements must be met in three key areas: performance, architectural, and trustworthiness. The scale of the improvements expected in general performance are perhaps the most striking: 6G must feature peak data rates of 1,000 Gbps (around 50 times that of 5G) as well as reducing the latency of 5G to one-tenth. 
 
The graphic below shows how Samsung expect 6G to compare to 5G in terms of performance.
 
 
The paper also suggests that much higher wavelengths will be used to facilitate 6G, with bands from 100 GHz to 10 THz being targetted. Use of these ultra-high bands will surely bring new challenges of their own; mmWave technology is only now being developed for 5G, so the use of THz bands will require a great deal of innovation when it comes to building out the network.
 
“While 5G commercialisation is still in its initial stage, it’s never too early to start preparing for 6G because it typically takes around 10 years from the start of research to commercialization of a new generation of communications technology,” said Sunghyun Choi, head of Samsung’s advanced communications research center. “We’ve already launched the research and development of 6G technologies by building upon the experience and ability we have accumulated from working on multiple generations of communications technology, including 5G. Going forward, we are committed to leading the standardisation of 6G in collaboration with various stakeholders across industry, academia and government fields.”
 
While 5G continues to dominate the telecoms sector today, it is, as Choi says, “never too early” to get ahead of the game. Samsung established its Advanced Communications Research Centre in 2019 and is not alone in researching 6G tech. China Unicom and ZTE announced they were teaming up for 6G back in May, and research projects are also ongoing in a number of countries, including Japan and Finland.
 
 
Also in the news:

Since you're here...

...the Telecoms industry is characterised by constant change and evolution. That's why it's crucial for telecoms professionals to keep up-to-date with what is happening. Join 35,000+ of your peers and sign up to our free newsletter service today, to be in the know about what is going on. PLUS, as a member you can submit your own press releases!

See all membership options

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Newsletter signup

Quickly get on board and up to date with the telecoms industry