Sunday, 05 July 2020

Canada agrees to hear extradition case against Huawei CFO

by Harry Baldock, Total Telecom
Thursday 28 May 20

The crimes of which Meng Wanzhou are accused make her eligible for extradition, ruled a judge

Controversial Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is to face an official extradition hearing, after a Canadian judge ruled that the crimes of which she is accused by the US government are also crimes in Canada.    Meng was placed under house arrest in Canada back in December 2018, after the US levied various financial charges against her…

Controversial Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is to face an official extradition hearing, after a Canadian judge ruled that the crimes of which she is accused by the US government are also crimes in Canada. 
 
Meng was placed under house arrest in Canada back in December 2018, after the US levied various financial charges against her. Since then, her detention has been a sore spot for Canada–China relations, who accused them of ‘hostage diplomacy’, with the US pressuring their northern cousin hard to facilitate Meng’s transfer to the US.
 
The case has been mired in complex legal discussion for over a year, since the crimes of which Meng is accused primarily relate to the US’s trade sanctions against Iran, which are not in place in Canada. Yesterday, however, the judge ruled that the crimes Meng is accused of are essentially fraud and would have been criminal offences in Canada in similar circumstances.
 
Meng and Huawei continue to maintain her innocence and have pledged to fight the impending extradition process. 
 
"Huawei continues to stand with Ms. Meng in her pursuit for justice and freedom," said Huawei Canada in a statement. "We expect that Canada's judicial system will ultimately prove Ms. Meng's innocence. Ms. Meng's lawyers will continue to work tirelessly to see justice is served."
 
Opinions are divided about the judges decision, with some lawyers praising the decision for putting the sanctity of law above political pressure, while others have stated that considering some but not all of the context surrounding the economic sanctions leaves the door open for legal appeal.
 
The next phase of the process will be to ascertain if Meng’s arrest itself was legal, with Meng claiming her rights were violated. However, officials say they have seen no evidence to suggest that the arrest was illegal.
 
As always with complex criminal cases, this process is sure to continue at an excruciatingly slow pace and, in the meantime, the US–China trade war will continue to boil over in the background. Meng’s trial will be yet another key feature in what is being described by some as ‘the new Cold War’.
 
 
Also in the news: 

Since you're here...

...the Telecoms industry is characterised by constant change and evolution. That's why it's crucial for telecoms professionals to keep up-to-date with what is happening. Join 35,000+ of your peers and sign up to our free newsletter service today, to be in the know about what is going on. PLUS, as a member you can submit your own press releases!

See all membership options

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Newsletter signup

Quickly get on board and up to date with the telecoms industry