Saturday, 21 September 2019

Getting Britain’s buildings connected

By Richard Bourne, CEO, StrattoOpencell
Monday 17 June 19

As we begin to see the first 5G networks going live in the UK, the reality remains that cellular coverage of any kind can often be patchy, particularly where it is most needed – in buildings.

Research has shown that some 90% of all mobile use takes place indoors, and increasingly today’s enterprises are adopting policies like Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or ‘Mobile First’, where landlines are being completely replaced. These approaches require support for all mobile operators in order to be effective. However, even as mindsets shift, and the demand for connectivity indoors rises, the problem of poor in-building coverage is simultaneously being exacerbated by modern building materials and techniques which…

Research has shown that some 90% of all mobile use takes place indoors, and increasingly today’s enterprises are adopting policies like Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or ‘Mobile First’, where landlines are being completely replaced. These approaches require support for all mobile operators in order to be effective. However, even as mindsets shift, and the demand for connectivity indoors rises, the problem of poor in-building coverage is simultaneously being exacerbated by modern building materials and techniques which…

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