Tuesday, 19 March 2019

Huawei: Potential US ban would have no major impact on our business

By Chris Kelly, Total Telecom
Friday 15 February 19

President Trump's government is reportedly considering a ban on Chinese network equipment providers operating in the US

Huawei's deputy chairman, Eric Xu, has said that any potential ban on Huawei operating in the US would have little effect on the company's business, as it has only negligible operations in the country.  Speaking to a group of journalists in Shenzhen, Xu was responding to questions about President Trump's proposal to ban Chinese network equipment providers from operating in the US' telecoms sector…

Huawei's deputy chairman, Eric Xu, has said that any potential ban on Huawei operating in the US would have little effect on the company's business, as it has only negligible operations in the country. 

Speaking to a group of journalists in Shenzhen, Xu was responding to questions about President Trump's proposal to ban Chinese network equipment providers from operating in the US' telecoms sector. 

"First, I want to share with you that Huawei's infrastructure equipment is basically not present in the US market. And even smartphones now are virtually not present there," Xu explained. 

"In history, Huawei's 4G equipment served rural carriers in the United States, providing universal services to people living in remote rural areas. I saw those stories from the press that you mentioned, but no matter how the outcome turns out, I think it would not have a major impact on Huawei's business. Because, as I mentioned just now, we have virtually no business presence in the US, and we don't have the expectation to build up a major presence there," he added. 

Xu was later asked about comments made by US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, warning European nations against doing business with Chinese tech companies.  

"I think Mr. Pompeo's remarks are just yet another indication that the US government is undertaking a well-coordinated geopolitical campaign against Huawei. It's essentially using a national machine against a small company, as small as a sesame seed.

"Are they truly considering the cyber security and the privacy protection of the people in other nations, or are there possibly other motives? Some other people argue that they try to find leverage for the US-China trade negotiations. Other people argue that if Huawei equipment was used in those countries, US agencies would find it harder to get access to the information of those people, or find it harder to intercept the mobile communications of those countries or their leaders. I believe in the wisdom of the 7 billion people in the world. I think they clearly can see these different possibilities," said Xu. 

Also in the news: 

US threatens Europe over Huawei's 5G plans

Thai 5G test bed is opportunity for Huawei to showcase security credentials

Vodafone CEO: Banning Huawei would create a major problem for European telcos

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