Saturday, 23 September 2017

Net neutrality overreaction antics round two

By Nick Wood, Total Telecom
Friday 15 July 16

More eye-rolling as Web inventor warns open Internet is doomed unless BEREC closes non-existent loopholes.

Having heard the histrionics over net neutrality on the part of telcos last week, this week saw the other side of the debate proffer some portentous proclamations about what might happen to the Internet unless regulators take an even tougher stance on how data traffic is treated. None other than world wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig, and Internet and Society professor Barbara van Schewick of Stanford law school on Thursday penned an open letter, casually titled: "four days to save the open Internet in Europe". It's Friday today, so I suppose there are only three days left now; oops. Anyway, the deadline referred to is 18 July, when responses to BEREC's consultation on draft guidelines for how regulators should enforce the European Union's net neutrality rules are due. "The Internet has become the critical infrastructure of our time – for our daily life, for our economy, for our democracy. Strong guidelines will protect the future of competition, innovation, and creative expression in Europe, enhancing Europe's ability to lead in the digital economy…

Having heard the histrionics over net neutrality on the part of telcos last week, this week saw the other side of the debate proffer some portentous proclamations about what might happen to the Internet unless regulators take an even tougher stance on how data traffic is treated. None other than world wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig, and Internet and Society professor Barbara van Schewick of Stanford law school on Thursday penned an open letter, casually titled: "four days to save the open Internet in Europe". It's Friday today, so I suppose there are only three days left now; oops. Anyway, the deadline referred to is 18 July, when responses to BEREC's consultation on draft guidelines for how regulators should enforce the European Union's net neutrality rules are due. "The Internet has become the critical infrastructure of our time – for our daily life, for our economy, for our democracy. Strong guidelines will protect the future of competition, innovation, and creative expression in Europe, enhancing Europe's ability to lead in the digital economy…

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