Saturday, 22 July 2017

Press scandal may help us create better mobile security

By Simon Bransfield-Garth, Cellcrypt
Thursday 20 August 09

Alleged wiretapping activities of British journalists highlight need for additional security on voice calls.

We are all familiar with the occasions when apparently innocuous events act as turning points in popular perception in politics, business and everyday life. Recent revelations in U.K. newspaper the Guardian about the alleged wiretapping actions of reporters at the News of the World appear to be having that effect in the U.K. regarding the security of voice calling. The phrase "we should not be having this conversation on an open phone line" is one everyone knows. The belief that landlines are open to potential abuse by people physically "tapping" the call is widespread, yet this perception appears to be less widespread with mobile devices…

We are all familiar with the occasions when apparently innocuous events act as turning points in popular perception in politics, business and everyday life. Recent revelations in U.K. newspaper the Guardian about the alleged wiretapping actions of reporters at the News of the World appear to be having that effect in the U.K. regarding the security of voice calling. The phrase "we should not be having this conversation on an open phone line" is one everyone knows. The belief that landlines are open to potential abuse by people physically "tapping" the call is widespread, yet this perception appears to be less widespread with mobile devices…

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